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Moutet’s Moment: #NextGenATP Cracks Top 100 With Lyon Title

It was the coronation of Corentin on Sunday. #NextGenATP star Corentin Moutet has been fighting for this moment since he turned pro three years ago, and it was finally realized.

The 20-year-old from Neuilly-Sur-Seine, France, capped his Top 100 breakthrough with a title on home soil in Lyon. Moutet had his moment in the spotlight in front of a boisterous home crowd at the Open Sopra Steria, defeating Elias Ymer 6-4, 6-4 on Sunday afternoon.

Moutet was made to work for his fourth ATP Challenger Tour trophy and second of the year, battling for a pair of three-set wins before avenging a 2017 defeat to Ymer. He needed one hour and 50 minutes to prevail, sealing the title on his third match point.

“It’s a big satisfaction to win today,” said Moutet. “My opponent is a good player. I lost against him two years ago, here in Lyon. I was expecting a big fight today. I did my best all week and while it was hard sometimes, my level was quite high. I won and that’s the most important thing. Now I’m going back to work tomorrow.”

One week after enjoying a tour-level breakthrough at Roland Garros, stunning Guido Pella for his first appearance in the third round of a Grand Slam, he is reveling in a breakthrough of another kind. His victory in Lyon vaulted him to the Top 100 of the ATP Rankings for the first time, soaring to a career-high No. 86. In addition, he is up to seventh in the ATP Race To Milan, with the Top 7 automatically qualifying for the Next Gen ATP Finals in November.

“There are not a lot of ways to progress [up the ATP Rankings]. It happens by working constantly every day, not only sometimes. I know that if I want to progress, I have more to do. That’s why I’m going back to work tomorrow, to continue on this way and go a little bit more every day.”

The youth movement in France has now kicked into high gear. Canada is no longer the only nation with multiple #NextGenATP stars in the Top 100, with Moutet joining countryman Ugo Humbert in the elite club.  

#NextGenATP Top 100 Debuts In 2019

Player Age
Debut Date
Felix Auger-Aliassime 18 25 February
Casper Ruud 20 4 March
Miomir Kecmanovic 19 18 March
Corentin Moutet
20 17 June

Earlier in the year, Moutet etched his name in the history books with a title on the hard courts of Chennai, India. He became the first teenager to triumph in three consecutive seasons since Evgeny Korolev achieved the feat from 2005-07. Now, aged 20, Moutet is close to putting his Challenger days behind him.

“We all make mistakes, but what we have to keep in mind is that we learn from our mistakes. I wasn’t perfect during this tournament, but I’m still learning. Improving each day on the court but also outside is really important. I’m learning and growing.”

Moutet

Moutet’s Moment: #NextGenATP Cracks Top 100 With Lyon Title

It was the coronation of Corentin on Sunday. #NextGenATP star Corentin Moutet has been fighting for this moment since he turned pro three years ago, and it was finally realized.

The 20-year-old from Neuilly-Sur-Seine, France, capped his Top 100 breakthrough with a title on home soil in Lyon. Moutet had his moment in the spotlight in front of a boisterous home crowd at the Open Sopra Steria, defeating Elias Ymer 6-4, 6-4 on Sunday afternoon.

Moutet was made to work for his fourth ATP Challenger Tour trophy and second of the year, battling for a pair of three-set wins before avenging a 2017 defeat to Ymer. He needed one hour and 50 minutes to prevail, sealing the title on his third match point.

“It’s a big satisfaction to win today,” said Moutet. “My opponent is a good player. I lost against him two years ago, here in Lyon. I was expecting a big fight today. I did my best all week and while it was hard sometimes, my level was quite high. I won and that’s the most important thing. Now I’m going back to work tomorrow.”

One week after enjoying a tour-level breakthrough at Roland Garros, stunning Guido Pella for his first appearance in the third round of a Grand Slam, he is reveling in a breakthrough of another kind. His victory in Lyon vaulted him to the Top 100 of the ATP Rankings for the first time, soaring to a career-high No. 86. In addition, he is up to seventh in the ATP Race To Milan, with the Top 7 automatically qualifying for the Next Gen ATP Finals in November.

“There are not a lot of ways to progress [up the ATP Rankings]. It happens by working constantly every day, not only sometimes. I know that if I want to progress, I have more to do. That’s why I’m going back to work tomorrow, to continue on this way and go a little bit more every day.”

The youth movement in France has now kicked into high gear. Canada is no longer the only nation with multiple #NextGenATP stars in the Top 100, with Moutet joining countryman Ugo Humbert in the elite club.  

#NextGenATP Top 100 Debuts In 2019

Player Age
Debut Date
Felix Auger-Aliassime 18 25 February
Casper Ruud 20 4 March
Miomir Kecmanovic 19 18 March
Corentin Moutet
20 17 June

Earlier in the year, Moutet etched his name in the history books with a title on the hard courts of Chennai, India. He became the first teenager to triumph in three consecutive seasons since Evgeny Korolev achieved the feat from 2005-07. Now, aged 20, Moutet is close to putting his Challenger days behind him.

“We all make mistakes, but what we have to keep in mind is that we learn from our mistakes. I wasn’t perfect during this tournament, but I’m still learning. Improving each day on the court but also outside is really important. I’m learning and growing.”

Moutet

Moutet Leading France’s #NextGenATP At Roland Garros

#NextGenATP Frenchman Corentin Moutet was within reach of the best Grand Slam showing of his young career. But the 20-year-old couldn’t quite tip his head over the line.

Moutet led 19th seed Guido Pella 6-3, 6-1, 2-6, 5-0 on Wednesday afternoon at Roland Garros. The packed crowd at Court 7 was ready to guide Moutet to the third round and help him become the youngest Frenchman to make the Round of 32 in Paris since Gael Monfils in 2006.

Pella, however, this season’s clay-court wins leader, played with nothing to lose, breaking twice and making it 5-5. Moutet, however, settled his nerves, held and then broke to avoid a deciding set against the 29-year-old left-hander.

You don’t have much margin against these players. They are excellent players, and when you’re a bit down, it’s very fast. So he did a bit more; I did a bit less,” Moutet said.

In my mind, I knew what I had to do. I tried not to panic. I tried to stay in the game… I realised at five-all I had to do more and I wanted to be in the front, and that was successful and that was nice.”

Pella said he never could find his best tennis against Moutet, and credited the home crowd with pushing the 20-year-old to his best result of the year.

To play a French guy in Roland Garros is much different than maybe playing in another tournament because they love to play here. The crowd is very special for them,” Pella said. “He didn’t have anything to lose, and I think he played that way.”

For the second year in a row, Moutet is playing some of his best tennis at his home Slam. Last year, Moutet won his first Grand Slam match in Paris, beating Croatian Ivo Karlovic.

This year, Moutet, No. 110 in the ATP Rankings, will play for a place in the Round of 16. He’ll face Argentine and Cordoba Open champion Juan Ignacio Londero, who’s also playing in the third round of a Grand Slam for the first time.

I have one match to win before being in the second week… I work every day to win matches, to play these tournaments against top players,” Moutet said.

His nerves under pressure have landed him here, a trait that will come in handy later this year if Moutet makes his debut at the fast-paced Next Gen ATP Finals in Milan.

Last week, in Lyon, Moutet won his first tour-level match of the season, saving two match points against big-serving American Reilly Opelka, who led 6/4 in the third-set tie-break. Moutet, however, navigated his way through the tie-break to advance 6-3, 2-6, 7-6(10).

Infosys powers real-time insights for every point

He made life much easier to start in Paris, advancing in straight sets against Russian qualifier Alexey Vatutin.

Moutet works with Emmanuel Planque, the former longtime coach of Australian Open semi-finalist and World No. 26 Lucas Pouille of France. Moutet said Planque provides the discipline he needs to succeed on the ATP Tour.

He’s very demanding, and I need that. So we work a lot, also with my [physio], and we work hard and regularly,” Moutet said. “What is important is to work hard and to be consistent. We do the job every day, and whatever happens in this tournament will continue whether I win or I lose.

We try not to be influenced by victories or defeats and try to continue working on a daily basis and do things well.”

It could be a French invasion at the Next Gen ATP Finals, which will host the world’s best 21-and-under players from 5-9 November. Moutet is currently in ninth place in the ATP Race To Milan, which will determine seven of the eight players, and his countryman Ugo Humbert, 20, is one spot ahead of him.

At Roland Garros, however, Moutet, alone, is still representing France’s #NextGenATP.

Moutet Leading France’s #NextGenATP At Roland Garros

#NextGenATP Frenchman Corentin Moutet was within reach of the best Grand Slam showing of his young career. But the 20-year-old couldn’t quite tip his head over the line.

Moutet led 19th seed Guido Pella 6-3, 6-1, 2-6, 5-0 on Wednesday afternoon at Roland Garros. The packed crowd at Court 7 was ready to guide Moutet to the third round and help him become the youngest Frenchman to make the Round of 32 in Paris since Gael Monfils in 2006.

Pella, however, this season’s clay-court wins leader, played with nothing to lose, breaking twice and making it 5-5. Moutet, however, settled his nerves, held and then broke to avoid a deciding set against the 29-year-old left-hander.

You don’t have much margin against these players. They are excellent players, and when you’re a bit down, it’s very fast. So he did a bit more; I did a bit less,” Moutet said.

In my mind, I knew what I had to do. I tried not to panic. I tried to stay in the game… I realised at five-all I had to do more and I wanted to be in the front, and that was successful and that was nice.”

Pella said he never could find his best tennis against Moutet, and credited the home crowd with pushing the 20-year-old to his best result of the year.

To play a French guy in Roland Garros is much different than maybe playing in another tournament because they love to play here. The crowd is very special for them,” Pella said. “He didn’t have anything to lose, and I think he played that way.”

For the second year in a row, Moutet is playing some of his best tennis at his home Slam. Last year, Moutet won his first Grand Slam match in Paris, beating Croatian Ivo Karlovic.

This year, Moutet, No. 110 in the ATP Rankings, will play for a place in the Round of 16. He’ll face Argentine and Cordoba Open champion Juan Ignacio Londero, who’s also playing in the third round of a Grand Slam for the first time.

I have one match to win before being in the second week… I work every day to win matches, to play these tournaments against top players,” Moutet said.

His nerves under pressure have landed him here, a trait that will come in handy later this year if Moutet makes his debut at the fast-paced Next Gen ATP Finals in Milan.

Last week, in Lyon, Moutet won his first tour-level match of the season, saving two match points against big-serving American Reilly Opelka, who led 6/4 in the third-set tie-break. Moutet, however, navigated his way through the tie-break to advance 6-3, 2-6, 7-6(10).

Infosys powers real-time insights for every point

He made life much easier to start in Paris, advancing in straight sets against Russian qualifier Alexey Vatutin.

Moutet works with Emmanuel Planque, the former longtime coach of Australian Open semi-finalist and World No. 26 Lucas Pouille of France. Moutet said Planque provides the discipline he needs to succeed on the ATP Tour.

He’s very demanding, and I need that. So we work a lot, also with my [physio], and we work hard and regularly,” Moutet said. “What is important is to work hard and to be consistent. We do the job every day, and whatever happens in this tournament will continue whether I win or I lose.

We try not to be influenced by victories or defeats and try to continue working on a daily basis and do things well.”

It could be a French invasion at the Next Gen ATP Finals, which will host the world’s best 21-and-under players from 5-9 November. Moutet is currently in ninth place in the ATP Race To Milan, which will determine seven of the eight players, and his countryman Ugo Humbert, 20, is one spot ahead of him.

At Roland Garros, however, Moutet, alone, is still representing France’s #NextGenATP.