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Tsitsipas: ‘I Would Love To See Myself Playing In The O2’

Reigning Next Gen ATP Finals champion Stefanos Tsitsipas likes to explore the cities he visits during his travels on the ATP Tour. But when a reporter asked him on Sunday ahead of the Fever-Tree Championships where he would like to visit in London, the World No. 6 did not mention a tourist attraction.

“I would love to see myself playing in The O2 Arena in November,” Tsitsipas said.

The Greek star is trying to qualify for the Nitto ATP Finals for the first time, and he is off to a good start. Tsitsipas is in fifth place in the ATP Race To London, and he holds a 1,230-point lead over sixth-placed Kei Nishikori. The Top 8 players in the Race qualify for the season finale, to be held at The O2 from 10-17 November.

But for now, Tsitsipas will focus on the present, as he is the top seed at Queen’s Club. The three-time ATP Tour titlist is pursuing his first tour-level grass-court trophy.

“I haven’t really showed anything yet on grass in my opinion,” said Tsitsipas, who faces home favourite Kyle Edmund in the first round. “It can always be tricky when there are so many different surfaces that you need to adjust and adapt to throughout the year. I only had one match last week [in ‘s-Hertogenbosch]. I haven’t really felt everything that I have to feel here on grass, so I might say it’s going to take quite a while to adjust to those new conditions on which I haven’t played for a year now.”

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It will be Tsitsipas’ first FedEx ATP Head2Head meeting against Edmund. The Greek will be looking to get back on track after being upset in his first match at the Libema Open by Chilean Nicolas Jarry.

“I think we’re pretty equal,” Tsitsipas said of facing Edmund. “He hasn’t played a match as well, so it’s all going to be a matter of right decisions and concentration levels because everything’s happening very fast on grass.”

Tsitsipas has fond memories of this surface from his junior career, when he made the boys’ singles semi-finals at Wimbledon and won the boys’ doubles title. As a professional, he reached the fourth round at the grass-court Grand Slam last year.

That leaves him confident that he is capable of performing well during this swing. However, he knows it will take an adjustment from how he played on clay, where he made the final in Madrid, semi-final in Rome and captured the trophy in Estoril.

“There’re a lot of differences between clay and grass. You have to stay lower, you have to have faster anticipation and not necessarily play extreme tennis. You have to play clean, you have to come to the net,” Tsitsipas said. “Instead of trying to spin the ball a lot, or trying to open the court, that doesn’t really work on grass. You have to stay low, come to the net, serve well.”

This is the first time that Tsitsipas has been the top seed at an ATP 500 tournament. It’s been a rapid ascent for the 20-year-old, who began the 2018 season at No. 91 in the ATP Rankings. But he does not feel the weight of the expectations that may come with his accomplishments.

“I don’t even watch the draws to be honest. I don’t know who is in my part of the draw. I don’t know who is No. 2,” Tsitsipas said. “I just play. I have to play. I don’t have to think if I’m No. 1 or No. 2. That probably means some players would think about it when they play against you, but if you think of it too much when you play like, ‘I’m the No. 1, I’m the one who is the favourite. I’m the one who everybody expects me to win,’ then you become kind of lazy. You expect everything to come easier to you just because you’re No. 1 or 2 or 3 or 4. I have to play the way I’ve been playing all this time, without thinking of all those small details.”

Tsitsipas may well be the hunted now rather than the hunter. But if nothing else the Greek knows he has to continue his evolution to improve even more. 

“Players know me, players know what to expect,” Tsitsipas said. “So I really hope I do well and leave from the grass-court season with great memories and great moments from that surface.”

Tsitsipas: ‘I Would Love To See Myself Playing In The O2’

Reigning Next Gen ATP Finals champion Stefanos Tsitsipas likes to explore the cities he visits during his travels on the ATP Tour. But when a reporter asked him on Sunday ahead of the Fever-Tree Championships where he would like to visit in London, the World No. 6 did not mention a tourist attraction.

“I would love to see myself playing in The O2 Arena in November,” Tsitsipas said.

The Greek star is trying to qualify for the Nitto ATP Finals for the first time, and he is off to a good start. Tsitsipas is in fifth place in the ATP Race To London, and he holds a 1,230-point lead over sixth-placed Kei Nishikori. The Top 8 players in the Race qualify for the season finale, to be held at The O2 from 10-17 November.

But for now, Tsitsipas will focus on the present, as he is the top seed at Queen’s Club. The three-time ATP Tour titlist is pursuing his first tour-level grass-court trophy.

“I haven’t really showed anything yet on grass in my opinion,” said Tsitsipas, who faces home favourite Kyle Edmund in the first round. “It can always be tricky when there are so many different surfaces that you need to adjust and adapt to throughout the year. I only had one match last week [in ‘s-Hertogenbosch]. I haven’t really felt everything that I have to feel here on grass, so I might say it’s going to take quite a while to adjust to those new conditions on which I haven’t played for a year now.”

Watch Live

It will be Tsitsipas’ first FedEx ATP Head2Head meeting against Edmund. The Greek will be looking to get back on track after being upset in his first match at the Libema Open by Chilean Nicolas Jarry.

“I think we’re pretty equal,” Tsitsipas said of facing Edmund. “He hasn’t played a match as well, so it’s all going to be a matter of right decisions and concentration levels because everything’s happening very fast on grass.”

Tsitsipas has fond memories of this surface from his junior career, when he made the boys’ singles semi-finals at Wimbledon and won the boys’ doubles title. As a professional, he reached the fourth round at the grass-court Grand Slam last year.

That leaves him confident that he is capable of performing well during this swing. However, he knows it will take an adjustment from how he played on clay, where he made the final in Madrid, semi-final in Rome and captured the trophy in Estoril.

“There’re a lot of differences between clay and grass. You have to stay lower, you have to have faster anticipation and not necessarily play extreme tennis. You have to play clean, you have to come to the net,” Tsitsipas said. “Instead of trying to spin the ball a lot, or trying to open the court, that doesn’t really work on grass. You have to stay low, come to the net, serve well.”

This is the first time that Tsitsipas has been the top seed at an ATP 500 tournament. It’s been a rapid ascent for the 20-year-old, who began the 2018 season at No. 91 in the ATP Rankings. But he does not feel the weight of the expectations that may come with his accomplishments.

“I don’t even watch the draws to be honest. I don’t know who is in my part of the draw. I don’t know who is No. 2,” Tsitsipas said. “I just play. I have to play. I don’t have to think if I’m No. 1 or No. 2. That probably means some players would think about it when they play against you, but if you think of it too much when you play like, ‘I’m the No. 1, I’m the one who is the favourite. I’m the one who everybody expects me to win,’ then you become kind of lazy. You expect everything to come easier to you just because you’re No. 1 or 2 or 3 or 4. I have to play the way I’ve been playing all this time, without thinking of all those small details.”

Tsitsipas may well be the hunted now rather than the hunter. But if nothing else the Greek knows he has to continue his evolution to improve even more. 

“Players know me, players know what to expect,” Tsitsipas said. “So I really hope I do well and leave from the grass-court season with great memories and great moments from that surface.”

Tsitsipas Pumped Up After Dellien Win At Roland Garros

Stefanos Tsitsipas was in high spirits and fist pumping on Wednesday after booking his place in the third round at Roland Garros for the first time.

The sixth seed didn’t have things his own way, but weathered the pressure against Bolivian Hugo Dellien, who was making his Grand Slam championship debut this week, in a 4-6, 6-0, 6-3, 7-5 victory over two hours and 49 minutes. He now faces Filip Krajinovic of Serbia.

Speaking about what went through his mind after the first set, Tsitsipas admitted, “I started thinking what went wrong in the first set. That [bathroom] break helped me. So I went inside mentally prepared to fight more, and I was aware of the situation I was at. Once I got myself into the right mindset, things seemed to flow my way. And from there, winning the [second] set 6-0 was good confidence boost for me. Obviously, after that, he didn’t want to give up. He fought as much as he could. But I seemed to prevail at the end.”

View Infosys MatchBeats Of Tsitsipas’ Win

Tsitsipas let slip a 2-0 advantage at the start of the match, but powered through the second and third sets. The 20-year-old then recovered from 2-4 down in the fourth set and finally converted his fourth match point to improve to a 31-11 record in 2019.

Tsitsipas, who is the third Greek man to reach the third round in Paris, following in the footsteps of Lazaros Stalios in 1936 and Nicky Kalogeropoulos in 1965 and 1967, has picked up two ATP Tour trophies this season at the Open 13 Provence (d. Kukushkin) and at the Millennium Estoril Open (d. Cuevas).

Later in the day, Krajinovic hit 87 winners to scrape past Spain’s Roberto Carballes Baena 6-4, 6-4, 6-7(1), 3-6, 8-6 in four hours and 15 minutes. Krajinovic, appearing in the Roland Garros main draw for only the third time (also 2012, 2015), first held one match point on serve at 6-5, 40/30 in the third set.

Read: Krajinovic, 2017 Paris Masters Finalist, Is Finally Relaxed

Infosys powers real-time insights for every point

Tsitsipas Pumped Up After Dellien Win At Roland Garros

Stefanos Tsitsipas was in high spirits and fist pumping on Wednesday after booking his place in the third round at Roland Garros for the first time.

The sixth seed didn’t have things his own way, but weathered the pressure against Bolivian Hugo Dellien, who was making his Grand Slam championship debut this week, in a 4-6, 6-0, 6-3, 7-5 victory over two hours and 49 minutes. He now faces Filip Krajinovic of Serbia.

Speaking about what went through his mind after the first set, Tsitsipas admitted, “I started thinking what went wrong in the first set. That [bathroom] break helped me. So I went inside mentally prepared to fight more, and I was aware of the situation I was at. Once I got myself into the right mindset, things seemed to flow my way. And from there, winning the [second] set 6-0 was good confidence boost for me. Obviously, after that, he didn’t want to give up. He fought as much as he could. But I seemed to prevail at the end.”

View Infosys MatchBeats Of Tsitsipas’ Win

Tsitsipas let slip a 2-0 advantage at the start of the match, but powered through the second and third sets. The 20-year-old then recovered from 2-4 down in the fourth set and finally converted his fourth match point to improve to a 31-11 record in 2019.

Tsitsipas, who is the third Greek man to reach the third round in Paris, following in the footsteps of Lazaros Stalios in 1936 and Nicky Kalogeropoulos in 1965 and 1967, has picked up two ATP Tour trophies this season at the Open 13 Provence (d. Kukushkin) and at the Millennium Estoril Open (d. Cuevas).

Later in the day, Krajinovic hit 87 winners to scrape past Spain’s Roberto Carballes Baena 6-4, 6-4, 6-7(1), 3-6, 8-6 in four hours and 15 minutes. Krajinovic, appearing in the Roland Garros main draw for only the third time (also 2012, 2015), first held one match point on serve at 6-5, 40/30 in the third set.

Read: Krajinovic, 2017 Paris Masters Finalist, Is Finally Relaxed

Infosys powers real-time insights for every point

Khachanov Wins Moscow Title; Edmund Captures Antwerp Crown; Tsitsipas Claims Maiden Title in Stockholm

VTB Kremlin Cup—Moscow, Russia

Hometown hero Karen Khachanov defeated No. 3 seed Adrian Mannarino 6-2, 6-2 on Sunday to capture his third career title in Moscow, Russia. Dominating the match from start to finish, Khachanov needed 53 minutes to complete the encounter. Hitting six aces and winning 80 percent of his first serve points, Khachanov kept Mannarino to only 15 percent of his second serve points won. Improving to 3-0 against Mannarino in lifetime meetings, Khachanov collected 250 ATP World Tour points toward his ranking.

Mannarino, who was in search of his first career title, fell to 0-6 in Tour level finals.

*****

European Open—Antwerp, Belgium

Top seed Kyle Edmund captured his maiden career title on the ATP World Tour on Sunday, dismissing No. 6 seed Gael Monfils 36 76(2) 76(4) in Antwerp, Belgium.

In a match that took two hours and 25 minutes to complete, Edmund withstood 17 aces from Monfils to capture his first title. Hitting four aces of his own, Edmund won 77 percent of his first serve points and 61 percent of his second serve points.

Monfils, who has encountered another year full of injury, was attempting to win his second title after prevailing in Doha, Qatar at the beginning of the season. Playing in his 28th career final, Monfils fell to 7-21 in championship matches.

*****

Intrum Stockholm Open—Stockholm, Sweden

No. 3 seed Stefanos Tsitsipas captured his maiden career ATP World Tour title on Sunday in Stockholm, Sweden, dismissing Ernests Gulbis 6-4, 6-4.

In a match that featured even play throughout, Tsitsipas broke once in each set on the strength of his strong baseline play. Winning 83 percent of his first serve points and 77 percent of his second serve points, Tsitsipas won 250 ATP World Tour points for his efforts.

Gulbis, who was attempting to win his seventh career title, fell to 6-1 in championship matches. The Latvian was playing in his first final in over four years.